Subject taster workshops

Throughout the year, we send current postgraduate students to schools and colleges to deliver one subject specific taster workshops to Key Stage 3, 4 and 5 students.  These one hour workshops are designed to inspire your students to study a social science and to give them an insight into new topics and build upon their current subject knowledge.

We are flexible in how we offer these workshops and are able to deliver them both in person and online in the following subject areas:

  • Business
  • Geography and Environment
  • Law
  • Politics
  • Sociology and Social Policy

These workshops are free of charge to schools and colleges. Please be aware that due to a limited budget we can only deliver live in person workshops to schools which are within two hours of the university by public transport.

To book your workshop, please complete the booking form here.

For more information on our subject taster workshops please contact us on socialscience@leeds.ac.uk

Please browse our workshop selection below:

Business

Introduction to Business Analytics and Decision Sciences - KS4/5

Throughout this session, students will explore the world of Business Analytics and Decision Sciences, discovering how they can help businesses and individuals solve major problems and make impactful decisions. This interactive workshop will provide students with the opportunity to act as a Business Analyst and get involved in scenario based discussions to put their newfound knowledge into practice

Geography and Environment

Introduction to microplastics in the environment - KS4/5

This interactive session will give students an overview of the presence and impact of microplastics in the environment. The aim of this workshop is to develop students’ understanding of microplastics, gaining a detailed introduction to microplastic pollution – an issue that has prompted recent headlines due to the scale of the problem. Key themes covered in this session include sources of microplastics, how they are transferred through the environment and their impacts in the environment on living organisms. Students will then apply the knowledge they have gained throughout the session by creating new government strategies to combat microplastic pollution in the environment.  

The problem with food waste - KS4/5

The aim of this interactive workshop is to introduce the global challenge of food waste, its contribution to climate emissions and consider how we can improve food wastage. Did you know that one third of food is wasted annually, which contributes to 10% of carbon emissions? Many of us are unaware of how a bin toss of leftovers and a regular clean of our fridge is affecting our planet. This session will evoke debate around food waste, how it is happening and ways solve it. Through discussion and a variety of interactive activities, students will contextualise the complexity of food waste and explore existing contributions to solving food waste, particularly the growing use of insects.

What next after COP26? Environmental policies for the future - KS4/5

Last year, Glasgow held COP26 in which world leaders discussed plans to save the planet. However, there is tension between the relatively conservative policies being proposed by policymakers, and the ambitious ideas set out by young people. This workshop will bridge this gap by having students collect data online and collaborate with their peers to help create environmental policy which takes a holistic approach. Students will learn skills that help them improve their data gathering and data analysis, as well as creative problem solving. While this activity has been adapted from a politics course, it is open to students who are studying any social science subjects or those who have a particular interest in environmental issues more generally.

Law

Law and social justice: The impact of technology on education - KS4/5

Law and Social justice is concerned with the equal distribution of wealth and resources to give everybody the fair chance to grow and thrive in whatever field they choose. Students are introduced to using law for social justice by investigating social issues and inequalities in contemporary education. This session allows students to consider the relationship between the law and different aspects of time in schooling and the implication of technology. Students will learn whether laws are merely rules or if they are derived from varying perspectives, particularly in tackling new inequalities. Following a mixture of discussion and interactive activities, students will get the opportunity to put their newfound knowledge into practice by acting as policymakers to tackle inequalities in education. This taster session is ideal for students who have an interest in law, the nature of social developments, and want to learn about careers in the legal profession, public services or the third sector.

Politics

What next after COP26? Environmental policies for the future - KS4/5

Last year, Glasgow held COP26 in which world leaders discussed plans to save the planet. However, there is tension between the relatively conservative policies being proposed by policymakers, and the ambitious ideas set out by young people. This workshop will bridge this gap by having students collect data online and collaborate with their peers to help create environmental policy which takes a holistic approach. Students will learn skills that help them improve their data gathering and data analysis, as well as creative problem solving. While this activity has been adapted from a politics course, it is open to students who are studying any social science subjects or those who have a particular interest in environmental issues more generally.

Introduction to Parliamentary debate? KS4/5

In this interactive and lively workshop you will learn about the idea of Parliamentary debates, the importance of them, and why they are such a key part of democracy. Covering everything from “What’s better, cats or dogs?” right through to “Should euthanasia be legalised?”, you will uncover how debating impacts on decisions made that determine the future of the country.

Please note that this session is available as a series of three separate one-hour sessions (designed to take place across the course of the year)  or as a standalone session.

Sociology and Social Policy

Is chivalry really dead? KS4/5

The Chivalry Theory states that women are treated more leniently than men by the criminal justice system. Crime Statistics, Media Narratives, Public and Political discourse may contribute as evidence to the claim of chivalry among men towards women, but many scholars have argued otherwise. This session explores the relevance and validity of the Chivalry Thesis in relation to the treatment of women at various stages of the criminal justice system. Students are encouraged to participate and critically engage with sociological theory and concepts to identify the drawbacks of Chivalry Theory and the value of new Sociological Thought. In doing so, students are exposed to the relevancy of Sociology as an ongoing discipline, constantly assessing and discussing issues related to contemporary society.

The sociology of migration: Diaspora and transnationalism - KS4/5

Sociologists primarily focus on the social and cultural integration and movement of migrants, both regular and irregular. The contribution of those who move both in terms of human and financial capital, is what impacts on the social, economic and political development of a society. Migration and development are interrelated processes that shape human civilization. The overall development potential of people in the diaspora can reach significant levels, involving business creation, investments, remittances, skills circulation, exchange of experiences and even impacts on social and cultural roles of men and women at ‘home’. This has triggered policy initiatives to collect data and reach out to diaspora groups to answer one main question: what can be done today to maximise the development benefits of migration for all? Using interactive group activities, students will learn how the diaspora negotiate their hybrid identities in a different political and cultural space and the challenges they face.